Titled

Educating the mind leads to understanding.
Understanding leads to tolerance.
Tolerance leads to acceptance.
Acceptance leads to conversion.
Conversion is error.
Thus education leads to error.
The best way to prevent error is avoidance.
Avoidance leads to ignorance.
Thus is ignorance the ideal outcome of an educated mind.

Said slightly differently,

Educating the mind leads to understanding.
Understanding leads to tolerance.
Tolerance leads to acceptance.
Acceptance enables conversion.
Conversion is error.
In this way education makes error more likely.
The best way to prevent error is by avoidance.
Such avoidance leads to ignorance.
Thus can ignorance be the ideal outcome of an educated mind.

Stated with more attention to detail,

Educating the mind leads to understanding.
Partial understanding leads to tolerance.
Tolerance produces a more complete understanding.
A more complete understanding mandates intolerance.
Intolerance may at first seem to suggest avoidance.
Avoidance is action.
Action is typically revised according to outcome.
Revision necessarily omits some considerations.
Ignoring some contingencies is indistinguishable from ignorance.
Thus the appearance of ignorance can be one legitimate outcome of an educated mind.

Said succinctly with all this understood,

Educating the mind leads to understanding.
Understanding leads to tolerance.
Tolerance leads to acceptance.
Acceptance leads to conversion.
Conversion is error.
Thus education leads to error.
The best way to prevent error is avoidance.
Avoidance leads to ignorance.
Thus is ignorance the ideal outcome of an educated mind.

Titles that were considered for this group of ideas:

On the Use of the Educated Mind
The Truly Educated Mind
On the Nature of the Educated Mind
The Purpose of the Educated Mind
The Ultimate purpose of a Real Education
-no title-
(But the file itself must be named, and "Untitled" is a title, therefore:)
Titled.

     This article is meant to demonstrate a deficiency in the property of spoken language
and words. When the non-verbal component of the human intellect is not engaged and
words are used exclusively, many people would easily agree with the first line of this
piece, and they would, without difficulty, accept without question all of the apparently
consequent conclusions as valid and true, but when you stop and think, examining the
meanings carefully, you realize the statements are not complete, that additional
considerations legitimately apply, and this makes clear that the statements are deficient. 
Many people do not wait to experience the non-verbal conscious reflection on meanings
which the non-verbal mind can provide, because it takes time, and because silence and
patience are often required, and these are sometimes perceived as delay and unnecessary
interference. One thing that is important about this phenomenon is that persons who
try to get themselves elected to positions of power, where they are paid good incomes
even if all they do is show up and hold the title, so to speak, these make statements
which are also incomplete, deficient in meaning, distorted, accidentally or intentionally,
in order to acquire those votes. This is one reason every government always tends toward
corruption: The ideas behind governance originate in very large part primarily on the
basis of what seems to make sense verbally, and other factors—which can really only be
understood outside the limited meanings communicated by spoken language in the form
of words—are omitted or ignored.
     The non-verbal world is far greater than the verbal world, and it includes the verbal
world, because verbal language is an invented convention based upon tacit agreements
which humans make with each other about the meanings of certain types of audible
patterns consisting of vibrations in the air, or on visible patterns consisting of ink on a
page, or on some other sort of pattern, and this is essentially a transient arrangement
having to do with needs and desires which fit within an extended definition of
convenience, not a true understanding of reality.


by Robert Hampton Burt
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